Scholar Biography

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Scholar Biography

Aaron Neill

Linking Small-Scale Hydrological Flow Paths, Connectivity and Microbiological Transport to Protect Remote Private Water Supplies

Project Dates: 1 October 2015 - 30 September 2019
Aaron Neill

I am a Hydro Nation Scholar and PhD student within the Northern Rivers Institute, School of Geosciences at the University of Aberdeen. My work looks to employ cutting-edge techniques in catchment hydrology, isotope hydrology and microbiology to understand the linkages between hydrological connectivity and the transfer of microbiological pathogens to private water supplies at the plot to hillslope scale, with the aim of developing models to simulate current and scenario-based pathogen transfer risk. Prior to my PhD, I studied at Durham University, where I obtained an MSci in Geography (First Class). The aim of my Master’s project was to investigate the value of stable isotope tracers in improving the predictive capabilities of a fully-distributed, physically-based rainfall-runoff model.

To view Aaron's latest knowledge exchange outputs please use the relevant links below:

  • Linking Small-Scale Hydrological Flow Paths, Connectivity and Microbiological Transport to Protect Remote Private Water Supplies (Poster)
  • Tracer-Aided Modelling to Explore Non-Linearities in Flow Paths, Hydrological Connectivity and Faecal Contamination Risk (Poster)
  • Using Spatial-Stream-Network Models and Long-Term Data to Understand and Predict Dynamics of Faecal Contamination in a Mixed Land-Use Catchment (Journal Article)
  • Understanding and modelling long-term spatio-temporal dynamics of faecal contamination in a mixed land-use stream network (Poster)
  • Linking Small-Scale Hydrological Flow Paths, Connectivity and Microbiological Transport To Protect Remote Private Water Supplies (Presentation)
  • Long-Term Spatio-Temporal Patterns and Controls of Faecal Contamination Risk In An Agricultural Catchment (Poster)
  • Linking small-scale hydrological flow paths, connectivity and microbiological transport to protect remote private water supplies (Poster)

Knowledge Exchange Outputs